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GMA Welcomes Elizabeth Large, ND Back to Our Offices!

Elizabeth Large, NDBy Elizabeth Large, ND

Gordon Medical is delighted to have Elizabeth Large, ND back in our offices! Dr. Large is a board-certified Naturopathic doctor with 15 years clinical experience treating complex illness. She is trained as a primary doctor but her clinical emphasis is focused on treating complex disorders that might encompass the following: Chronic Lyme disease or infection, digestive disorders, chronic fatigue, mood disorders, allergies and endocrine imbalances. If you have seen numerous doctors for your medical condition without benefit, you are in the right place.

After many years of practice, Dr. Large began seeing patterns emerge among her patients, both pediatric and adult. Her patient population exhibited similar symptoms such as chronic fatigue, anxiety, depression, chronic digestive issues, high reactivity to foods and medications and other unusual symptoms. She discovered that many of her patients were suffering from chronic infections or neurotoxic illnesses such as Lyme disease, co-infections, mold and/or heavy metal toxicity. [Read more…]

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What Can Bio-identical Hormone Therapy Do for You?

Elizabeth Large, NDBy Elizabeth Large, ND

Current research on hormones brings new information to the discussion concerning the safety of hormone replacement therapies. The outcome of the Womens Health Initiative in 2002 reported that estrogen therapy increased risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer, blood blots, with some decreased risk of colon cancer and osteoporosis. Because of that study, estrogen received a bad rap, and a lingering fear of hormones remains. However, in the past 11 years, research has elucidated the difference between the animal derived estrogens and synthetic progestins previously used and bio-identical hormones. Bio-identical hormones are hormones with a molecular structure identical to our own. What is becoming clear is that the benefits of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (BHRT) far outweigh the risks for the majority of women and men if used properly. Safety depends on what type of hormones, how they are taken, your metabolism (detoxification), and the hormone levels in relation to other hormones.

Hormone optimization, nutrition, stress reduction, and exercise are all necessary factors for healthy aging. Hormonal treatment to correct deficiencies, if used safely, can improves quality of life, decrease overall inflammation and provide anti-aging properties. Adrenal hormones, thyroid, progesterone, testosterone and estrogen must be balanced in relation to one another to function properly. In this article I will discuss the current research behind hormonal therapies: estrogen, progesterone and testosterone for both men and women. In coming articles, I will discuss adrenal hormones: cortisol, pregnenelone and DHEA and the complexity of estrogen detoxification.

[Read more…]

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Why Might You Want to Use Hormone Replacement Therapy?

Elizabeth Large, NDBy Elizabeth Large, ND

You have probably heard a lot about hormone replacement therapy, both good and bad. Let’s look at some of the details of why you might consider using hormone replacement therapy as part of comprehensive, effective, and safe support for your overall health.

It could lengthen your healthy, functional life span.
It can help retain physical vigor, mental clarity and youthful appearance.
It has anti-aging effects on:

  • Skin
  • Hair
  • Sexual health
  • Brain function
  • Bone health
  • Maintaining ideal body weight/weight loss
  • Blood sugar control

It helps relieve menopausal symptoms: [Read more…]

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Colds, Flu, Upset Stomach, Sore Throats, Earaches: What Can You Do?

Elizabeth Large, NDBy Elizabeth Large, ND

The winter is always a time when acute illness make the rounds. Anyone with a chronic illness needs to be especially careful to protect themselves during this season. With holidays making extra demands on your time and energy, what can you do to make it through with the least amount of sickness this winter?

Of course being careful to avoid exposures is helpful. Be sure to wash your hands often. Soap and water is enough, you don’t have to use an antibacterial soap. The physical action is enough to remove any bacteria or viruses from your hands. Avoid being around people who are sick. Be sure to get enough rest, and eat well. Simple enough, but sometimes pushed aside during the holidays.

But what if this isn’t enough? Here is a  list of treatments that you can use to prevent and treat the winter bugaboos that are trying to make your holidays miserable.

[Read more…]

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Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammation

This Power Point presentation by Elizabeth Large ND
covers information on the effect Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance have on inflammation.

 

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Whole Families with Lyme Disease

Elizabeth Large, NDElizabeth Large ND

This summer I spent 10 days in Pennsylvania and Connecticut on a mission to learn how two well known Lyme literate doctors treat pediatric Lyme disease. This preceptorship is made possible by an ILADS scholarship for those wanting to expand their knowledge in treating Lyme disease. The first three days were spent with Dr. Ann Corson (see a slideshow of Dr. Corson’s practice philosophy) who practices in a town barely making the map in rural Pennsylvania. Dr. Corson is an integrative doctor who treats both adults and children. She has incorporated a well rounded natural approach as well as using antibiotics as needed.  I was impressed at her advanced knowledge in natural medicine and her open-mindedness to

[Read more…]

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Children at Risk for Lyme Disease

Elizabeth Large, NDBy Elizabeth Large, ND

Children are being misdiagnosed too frequently when they actually have Chronic Lyme Disease (CLD) or Tick Borne Disease (TBD). It is very important that parents, teachers, school administrators, school health professionals, pediatricians, mental health professionals and family members learn to understand the signs and symptoms of Lyme Disease. It is an epidemic and children are at high risk for contracting TBD. We need to identify both acute and chronic, persistent TBD. Acute infection is defined as infection for less than a year and easily treated with 6-12 weeks of antibiotics depending on the symptoms present. If a Bull’s Eye rash does occur then it is diagnostic of LD. Unfortunately only 15-30% of the time a Bull’s Eye rash occurs and other types of rash can present and not only around the tick bite site. The chronic form of CLD can be devastating and difficult to eradicate. It impacts all body systems especially the immune system, hormonal system and nervous system. The body begins to respond inappropriately creating further symptoms that can be painful and debilitating.

The primary take home message with children is that their symptoms can be subtle and easily written off as growing pains or increased emotional sensitivity until there is frank disability. Then they lose their normal childhood of playing with friends, participating in school activities, and other recreation outside of school. They lose the energy to lead normal lives. They become too sick.

[Read more…]

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Metabolic Syndrome: What Is It, and What Can You Do About It?

Elizabeth Large, NDBY Elizabeth Large, ND

Metabolic syndrome is called a syndrome rather than a disease because it refers to a group of risk factors that occur together and which increase the risk for coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, type 2 diabetes and stroke.  It is believed to effect approximately 25% or 47 million of the US population.  Risk factors for metabolic syndrome include: genetics, hypertension, insulin resistance, hyperlipidemia and obesity, especially increased abdominal girth. To determine if you suffer from metabolic syndrome, most doctors look for the presence of three or more of these components:

  • Central or abdominal obesity (measured by waist circumference):
    • Men – Greater than 40″
    • Women – Greater than 35″
  • Fasting blood triglycerides greater than or equal to 150 milligrams per deciliter of blood (mg/dL)
  • Blood HDL cholesterol:
    • Men – Less than 40 mg/dL
    • Women – Less than 50 mg/dL
  • Blood pressure greater than or equal to 130/85
  • Fasting glucose greater than or equal to 100 mg/dL [Read more…]