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Thyroid and Adrenal Problems: What You Don’t Know May Be Hurting You

The Cutting Edge of Health and Wellness Today
Friday August 15 at 2:00 PM

Thyroid and Adrenal Problems: What You Don’t Know May Be Hurting You

Today we will address the controversial issues of adrenal and thyroid deficiencies, which are closely inter-related. These problems are almost universal in chronically ill patients and they will address the difficulties with diagnosis and treatment so that listeners will better understand their therapeutic options.

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More Ideas for Highly Sensitive Patients

Question: How do you treat patients with highly sensitive bodies, I.E., people who develop impairment due to high or normal dosage of medication?

Treatment must be designed  according to the specific presentations of each person, but what we see most commonly is as follows.

1) Poor adrenal function – Sensitive people tend to have sensitive nervous systems. They tend to react more to their surroundings, have a lower threshold for stress, and therefore are more anxious, stressed  and  prone to insomnia in general. Over time, this takes a toll on their adrenals, which are the glands that deal with daily stress. Often this is present in childhood, and so by adulthood, the adrenal gland function is compromised, resulting in lower energy and little reserve. Gradually stressors require longer recovery time. Because adrenal glands contribute to production of progesterone, estrogen and testosterone, low adrenal function might also create other hormone deficiencies. We can test adrenal function by measuring your cortisol levels. [Read more…]

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Stages of Stress Response

Stages of Stress Response

By Sunjya Schweig, MD

In my integrative family medicine practice I see a wide variety of patients with different health concerns, including more and more patients with severe chronic illnesses such as chronic fatigue, fibromyalgia, and chronic infections with, for example, Lyme disease or viral infections.  Many of my patients do well on treatments; however, I am increasingly recognizing the importance of dealing with stress and the effects that stress can have on the human organism as a critical part of the treatment for these patients.

I want to describe some background on stress.  In future blog posts I will discuss interventions, both dietary, exercise based, adjusting sleep schedules, and then using active stress reduction techniques such as biofeedback, breathing techniques, qi-gong, etc. [Read more…]

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Dysauntonomia, Biotoxins, and Lyme

Question:

I have a long term lyme patient who has recovered from most of her lyme symptoms with the exception of intermittent hypo tension 80/40 with  pulse in the 40’s known as autonomic insufficiency or pots or dysautonomia.  For years when she has a lyme flare she will experience strabismus.  I am convinced that ocular damage is from the lyme and is part of the etiology for her flares as well as the  dysautonomia. None the less researching this subject quickly makes one realize that it is complex with many suspected etiologies.  I have started her on florinef .1 mg for now.  So anyone have any other pearls of wisdom?  She has been on cortef for years low dose.  Her endocrinologist did not check with me and also put her on cortef so she got a 30 mg dose for a month or so, of course she felt great.   I have had her consult with a cardiologist, endocrinologist as well as neurologist.  They just kind of threw up their hands especially with a ” lyme dx” in the mixture.  I will consult next week again with her neurologist in an effort  to co-manage this case but may get left holding the bag as I usually do in  trying to treat lyme patients.   Anyway I would appreciate tips on treating this common problem with our lyme patients. [Read more…]

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Treatment Fatigue

Answers from the Gordon Medical Staff

Question:

Please talk about treatment fatigue in general, in particular, what are your options if your body cannot tolerate antibiotics, maybe the liver function is limited?

By “treatment fatigue” I assume you mean that a specific patient cannot tolerate ongoing standard doses of antibiotics. I would like to address a broader view of this problem, since what it is really addressing is how capable the individual is of mobilizing their immune system (with the aid of antibiotics) to kill the infecting organisms (Lyme, Bartonella, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Mycoplasma, etc.), and then how capable it is to remove those dead organisms and toxins from the body. This requires the coordinated workings of the organs of detoxification: the liver, intestines, lymphatic system, kidneys, skin, lungs, and spleen, along with the immune system, to do this properly. [Read more…]

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Still Have Symptoms After Treatment for Babesia

Question: With a history of dysnomia related to babesia, although the babesia may be gone, I still have Neurally Mediated Hypotension, high BP (blood pressure), POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia), temperature problems, sleep off and on, it often takes until 5 AM to fall asleep, 8 years post-function adrenal collapse.  Please explain the physiological dynamics of what is going wrong with the autonomic nervous system and the hypo-pituitary adrenal system.

Answer from GMA Staff:

We have written about factors predisposing to infection, the “total load” and the cycle of maladaptive responses that can follow Lyme and tick-borne diseases.  In fact, these problems also are common among chronic fatigue (syndrome or not) patients, people suffering from long-term stress and others who are chronically-ill.

Our writer comments that after the infection has been treated, his (let’s assume) adrenal, autonomic, and other symptoms persist. [Read more…]